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The Irony and the Hypocrisy, the U.S. Department of Defense Is Using Blackberry for Its Privacy

January 27th, 2014

via chycho

The major selling point for BlackBerry has always been its security and privacy - the way it encrypted communication across its network was the only game in town - that is, until 2010, when governments threatened to “block encrypted BlackBerry corporate e-mail and messaging services” unless their security agencies were granted access to them.

This was the beginning of the demise of Blackberry. Because of The Surveillance State’s inability to spy on their own citizens, governments forced BlackBerry to change their business model, which in turn played a major role in the company’s collapse.

Ironic, considering the latest announcement from the U.S. Defense Department that approximately 98% of their smartphone purchases for their new network will be from BlackBerry because they offer the best option in the industry for secure communication.

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How to Protect Ourselves on Social Networks and from Data Collection Systems of Governments and Corporations

October 21st, 2013

via chycho

I. What’s Going On

Online, we are both a product for corporations and a person of interest to governments (2, 3).

Corporations are taking advantage of these times by changing their privacy policies so that they can track us, use us, and sell us whatever their algorithms decide that we need or want based on data they have acquired about our movements, contacts, desires, fantasies, or kinks. Governments on the other hand are using our data to make sure that we will never acquire enough power to change any policies that we deem to be a threat to our happiness, livelihood, or survival. In essence, we are at war with these organizations and we should act as such:

“…this is truly unprecedented in history. And what we’re seeing is secrecy and surveillance are completely subverting security and liberty, not just in the United States, but for many, many citizens around the world.”

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An example of how the surveillance state is hurting the U.S. economy: Ladar Levison confirms that he will be forced to move his business overseas

October 8th, 2013

via chycho

In a sign of things to come for the U.S. tech industry, Ladar Levison, the owner of Lavabit, the secure private encrypted email provider that shut down after 10 years of operation (2, 3) because he decided not to abide by the demands made by the United States government to spy on their 400,000 plus users, explains that if he loses his case against the U.S. government he will most likely hand over his company to someone overseas and let them run it. It’s important to note that the U.S. government already new that this would be the end result, that revelations about NSA’s PRISM program would hurt American Technology companies, but they didn’t really care.

Levison clarifies his position in the following interview on Democracy Now!. The segment in which he makes these comments occurs at approximately the 11 minute mark, but the whole interview is well worth watching, especially the part just before these comments where he explains how the U.S. government is “remotely loading malware onto people’s computers without any kind of restriction, restraint or oversight.”

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The Surveillance State Killed BlackBerry, and the Same Fate Awaits Other Tech Giants

September 22nd, 2013

via chycho

Being from Canada, interested in technology and the markets, and a privacy advocate, BlackBerry, formerly known as Research In Motion (RIM), has been on my radar for a number of years, so I would like to add my two cents regarding its demise (2, 3, 4, 5).

The two most important things we need to keep in mind about the “timeline of the company from RIM to Blackberry” are that: first, “when phone systems failed in New York and DC on 9/11, it was the BlackBerry network that provided backup communication”; second, contrary to popular belief, apps were never meant to be the feature selling point for its products, it was its security and privacy, the way it encrypted communication across its network that made it the only game in town.

In 2010, when governments threatened to “block encrypted BlackBerry corporate e-mail and messaging services if its security agencies were not granted access to them”, BlackBerry’s reply was:

“RIM also said it has drawn a firm line by insisting that any capabilities it provides to carriers for ‘lawful’ access purposes be limited by four main principles: Such access has to be legal, it must not exceed access imposed on RIM's competitors, it does not change the security architecture for Blackberry enterprise customers, and does not require a country-specific deal that does not conform to RIM's global standard for lawful access.”

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Orwellian Smart Grid Exposé to air Sept. 5

August 14th, 2013

By Rady Ananda
Activist Post

A single smart meter measuring a home’s electricity usage, by appliance, emits radiation 100 times higher than the level internationally recognized as “extreme concern” and 450 times higher than a cell phone.

These are but two of the facts presented in Josh del Sol’s long-awaited documentary, Take Back Your Power, which will air online September 5.

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Why the U.S. Government has such a hard-on for Edward Snowden

July 11th, 2013

by chycho

It’s not the act of revealing secrets that has gotten Edward Snowden in trouble, after all, members of the Bush Administration did exactly that in the Plame affair as did members of the Obama Administration by leaking the drone memo. Leaking classified documents doesn’t always lead to prosecution, on the contrary, sometimes it leads to advancement of personal agendas:

“Does the rule of law demand that leaks of highly classified information be prosecuted? If so, John Brennan and many other current and former national-security officials had better be given orange jumpsuits. They weren't even leaking to alert Americans to behavior that they found immoral. Often times, the U.S. national security establishment leaks to exploit a political advantage.”

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Profit Ties between Phony Terror Alerts, Airport Security and L-3 Communications

November 22nd, 2010

By Steve Scheetz and Rady Ananda
COTO Report

Since September 11, 2001, the US government has been operating with a demand for the understanding of the people. We, as part of this demand, are to allow certain limitations on our liberty in order to gain a certain level of security. But, given the questionable nature of what are likely exaggerated threats, coupled with Congressional enrichment from these expensive security technologies, the U.S. public is losing both liberty and security, as well as money.

Former director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge revealed details about how terrorism alerts are used. Among other things, Ridge admits that he was pressured to raise the terror alert to help Bush win re-election in 2004. According to the Associated Press, “He said the episode convinced him to follow through with his plans to leave the administration; he resigned on Nov. 30, 2004.”

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New Jersey moves to ban TSA scanners and sexually invasive frisks

November 17th, 2010

By Rady Ananda

"Is that a Pistole in your pocket, Nappy, or are you just happy to see us?"

In response to public and pilot outrage at sexual assault by transportation security authorities and to the carcinogenic x-ray machines used to scan flyers, New Jersey lawmakers announced on Monday the introduction of several resolutions banning such practices.

Additionally, the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security is holding a Transportation Security Administration Oversight Hearing today (10 AM Wednesday).

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TSA promises $10,000 fine for refusing sexual assault

November 14th, 2010

By Rady Ananda

At the San Diego International Airport yesterday, about one-fifth of the travelers were selected for sexual assault by transportation security agents. Though TSA’s website did not list SAN as one of the airports employing the carcinogenic naked scan or a full body rub down, one man was told his refusal to submit would result in a civil law suit and a $10,000 fine. Under 49 CFR Sec.s 1540.105 and 1540.107, as summarized in these 2004 TSA Sanction Guidelines, apparently TSA has Congressional support to fine people for refusing to submit to molestation.

John Tyner posted his video of the incident and described in detail the experience. At about 3:50 into the first video, Tyner tells TSA agents:

“If you touch my junk, I’m gonna have you arrested.”

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TSA targets 'smoking hot' woman for naked scan; fondles children

November 13th, 2010

By Rady Ananda

Are transportation security authorities looking for terrorists or a hard on? Why would 19 agents and police officers need to handle -- and watch -- a 20-something woman who happens to be 'smoking hot' get her breasts squeezed and twisted?

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